Endeavour Projects

Year 7 Endeavour

Endeavour Spice Rack Project

In term 1 students focus on skill building in the areas of digital and design technologies, with the Endeavour Spice Rack Project. Students build a spice using traditional woodworking skills, then decorate it using a digital design applied using the laser-cutter.

Nerdy Derby Project

In term 2, students complete the ‘Nerdy Derby’ Project. This requires students to collaborate in groups, working through the FGSC design process to design and build a vehicle that can travel along a pre-constructed six metre track. Sustainability is a key theme, with a requirement that most of the materials are recycled. They are presented with the problem in the following way:

You have just joined a team of engineers responsible for designing a new ride at a theme park. They have already designed and built the track and are now to design and build the vehicle. People who go to theme parks generally enjoy fast rides (although this is not always the case – maybe you want to design a slow one?). It is important for safety that the vehicle stays on the track and does not tip over! When building the ride, the theme park wants to use as much sustainable and recycled material as possible

In term 3 and 4, sustainability is the key theme for the major project of the year. Students work in groups to identify a problem related to sustainability, then follow the FGSC design process to develop a solution to the problem, which they then share with the school community.

Year 8 Endeavour

Endeavour Table-Top Game Project

In term 1 and 2, students work in groups and use the FGSC design process to design and build a table-top game, including a working prototype, instructions, rules and a marketing website.

Community Project

In term 3 and 4, community is the key theme for the major project of the year. Students work in groups to identify a problem related to their community, then follow the FGSC design process to develop a solution to the problem, which they then share with others.

Year 9 Endeavour

Rube-Goldberg Project

In term 1, students complete the ‘Rube-Goldberg’ Project. This requires students, in groups of four, to work through the FGSC design process to design and construct design and construct a Rube-Goldberg machine. They are presented with the project in the following way:

You have just joined a team of engineers responsible for inventing a working contraption that accomplishes a very simple task but in the most fantastically complicated way.

This over-engineered machine is referred to as a Rube Goldberg machine, which is named after an American cartoonist and inventor named Rube Goldberg. As a child he created cartoons, that later became inventions that required a chain reaction of steps all used to perform a very simple task.

The simple task could be something done daily, like putting rubbish in a bin, or pressing send on a text message; or maybe a task performed less often, like separating coins in a piggy bank or filling up a bucket of sand. Either way, the task is the unimportant part of the machine; but rather it’s the series of unnecessary steps designed and created that make the machine a Rube Goldberg machine.

Flight Project

In term 2, students complete the Endeavour Flight project. This requires students, in groups of four, to work through the FGSC design process to design and construct a toy that can take flight. Sustainability is a key theme, with a requirement that most of the materials are recycled. They are presented with the project in the following way:

You have just joined a team of engineers working at a toy company. They have been given the task of designing a range of toys that take flight and fit into the following categories (you will be on one of these teams):

  • Highest flier
  • Furthest flier
  • Most accurate
  • ‘Maddest’ skills

When building these toys, a variety of materials may be used, although the company wants to use as much sustainable and recycled material as possible. The company has also particularly stated that the toy cannot be thrown, but must take flight using a mechanism that can be initiated using no more than a person’s little finger.